Published ‘down under’!

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

As a keen photographer I have amassed quite a collection on my hard drive – and that’s the thing – what’s the point in taking all those photographs for them to never see the light of day? That was why, a couple of years ago, I decided to set up a website and start blogging – to share them and let them live. I don’t make any efforts to sell my work so that has been something of a bonus, even so, it was quite a surprise to be contacted recently by ‘Qweekend’, the glossy, award winning magazine issued with Saturday’s edition of Queensland’s ‘The Courier-Mail’. It’s quite fun to now be able to claim ‘international publication’ ( :) ) as my photograph of Sutton Veny is the featured image in their article this weekend about the Sutton Veny CE Primary School and their ANZAC Day ceremonies to remember those who died in the village during the First World War.

Sutton Veny CE Primary School, church and ANZAC commemorations

This has been posted before (my tenth post!) but it seemed a good excuse to share it again with a new audience :)

(All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

EXIF data: ISO 200, 1/3s, f11 at 270mm, RAW file converted with Capture NX2

Tangible history

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

It seems that spring is here without a decent winter, my favourite photographic season, ever materialising. The best on offer was a foggy day a couple of weeks ago so I was determined to make the most of it. Up before dawn with next to no visibility I drove (very slowly!) over to Avebury, a Neolithic henge and the largest stone circle in Europe, which encompasses the village of Avebury. Not as well known as Stonehenge it doesn’t draw the same crowds but on a busy summer day, like Stonehenge, it can still feel belittled by them.

This day was different: the village still slept and I was alone with the stones, their ghostly shapes looming out of the dense fog. They possessed a majesty and aura that echoed through the ages; their history was tangible and I was humbled in their presence. I hope these images speak for themselves ….

To see more from this encounter please visit my website.

(All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

EXIF data:
ISO 200, 1/50s, f11 at 38mm.
ISO 200, 1/80s, f11 at 42mm.
ISO 200, 1/60s, +0.7, f11 at 70mm.
ISO 200, 1/600s, -0.25, f11 at 55mm.
RAW files converted with Capture NX2

The old hedgerow

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

As the flood waters subside the fields become dark and sullen with thickening mud and the disturbed air rank with the dank smell of rotting vegetation. The illusory magic of the changing colours, textures and reflections of the temporary watery landscape is rapidly disappearing.  This image captures one of my favourite moments during the flood when the scruffy remnants of an old hedgerow were transformed, acquiring an almost ethereal beauty. Weathered trees, part of an old hedgerow, reflected in the flood water near South Newton in WiltshireI was lucky to be in the fortunate position of experiencing the extraordinarily high waters as something novel and beautiful – for many others it was, and is still, not so.

(All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

EXIF data: ISO 640, 625s, f20 at 24mm, RAW file converted with Capture NX2

Too much of a good thing?!

Tags

, , , , , , , , , ,

Having finally realised that there should be some good photo opportunities of Salisbury Cathedral reflected in the water meadows, the first dry(ish!) afternoon afterwards found me looking across the flooded fields to a classic and much photographed view of this beautiful building. The wind, although light, ruffled the water surface enough to make my intended shot impossible so I whiled away the time until it eventually died down, long after the sun had well and truly set. The slight flow of the water meant that a perfect reflection was never going to be had but still I waited for a pair of ducks to swim through the Cathedral and the swans to settle before pressing the shutter. Salisbury Cathedral and Cathedral Close reflected in the water meadowsAs it turns out, I think the added element of the illuminated Close works better than a daylight image would have done anyway – but – another picture of the Cathedral? …. is it too much of a good thing?! Not for me! :D

(All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

EXIF data: ISO 200, 25s, f6.3 at 50mm, RAW file converted with Capture NX2

Blinded by the light

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

After a steady breeze foiled my envisioned image of Salisbury Cathedral reflected in the water meadows I headed across to other nearby fields to see the extent of the flooding: it was quite impressive but not much of a picture and I turned to leave. At that moment the setting sun fell into the narrow gap between the low cloud and the rooftops, illuminating the Cathedral and the limestone exploded with an astounding brilliance into a blaze of gold. Up to my knees in water I grabbed a quick shot, should the moment prove too fleeting, before hurrying off to dry land to retrieve the filters from my backpack, my new vision being a golden streak between the bruised blue of the sky and the shadowed foreground. A hasty set up, a quick calculation and no sooner did the shutter click shut than the sun dipped below the rooftops and the moment was gone. With bated breath I checked the screen – the anticipation, relief, joy, satisfaction and all the other emotions of this moment will only really be understood by other photographers! Golden light on Salisbury Cathedral and reflections in the blue flooded water meadowsWith the growing dark and time to kill I made my way to the Cathedral for a night picture: something of a cliché but after all these years of living nearby about time I got my own! Salisbury Cathedral at night with the moon

(All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

EXIF data: ISO 200, 40s, f10 at 80mm, RAW file converted with Capture NX2 and ISO 200, 10s, f6.3 at 22mm, RAW file converted with Capture NX2. Converging verticals corrected with Photoshop’s Adaptive wide angle filter – an incredible tool!

Water, water everywhere

Tags

, , , , , ,

Following on from ‘Quiet Reflection‘ here is another local scene transformed by the rising water levels. This is usually a quiet little stream surrounded by fields, with this particular spot being popular with villagers for summer picnics. 

The Hatch Pool in Steeple Langford in the 2014 floodI’d been experimenting with long exposures but in this case I wanted to show the water in action. Not the high drama of crashing waves but the impassive, inexorable, encroaching nature of the beast.

Although relatively shallow (but perilously close to the top of my wellies!) the strength of the water was surprising, pushing hard at my legs and causing problems with my tripod. Trying to control five legs against the flow was not easy!

(All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

EXIF data: ISO 200, 1/40s, f8 at 32mm, RAW file converted with Capture NX2

Win a Nikon Coolpix S9500!

Tags

, , , , , ,

Hurrah – I’ve been shortlisted!! Last month’s Nikon ‘In Frame’ photo competition was Black & White; I entered ‘Bovine Beauty’ (first seen here), crossed my fingers and held my breath. Having given up hope a couple of days ago, this morning I received an e-mail letting me know that I’d been shortlisted! The five potentially winning photographs are open to a public vote and you could be in with a chance to win a Nikon Coolpix S9500 simply by voting …. of course I’d be lying if I said I wouldn’t appreciate your support :D

Click on this link ‘Nikon In Frame’ and vote for your favourite – good luck!Nikon In Frame - 2014 January

 (All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

Website – all new look!

Tags

, , , , , , , ,

Early in December I mentioned that I was planning on giving my website a complete overhaul – and I’m pleased to say that it is now complete. Away from this blog I have been quietly working on, what turned out to be, a rather challenging monochrome project as a way of broadening my photographic horizons – and it certainly achieved that. I have found that I’m looking at things around me in a totally different way and have finally realised that the creation of B&W images is where my photographic heart really lies. My website now reflects that with the great majority of images now in monochrome – a selection of colour images have been moved to the Galleries section of this blog and there are links between both blog and website for easy navigation. The current cover image of my website is my favourite winter photograph of last year …. and is probably the most snow I’m going to see this winter in what is generally a grey and soggy southern England! Website launchThere are many images that have not featured in this blog so please, take a look, and let me know what you think.

 (All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

Quiet reflection

Tags

, , , , , , ,

The recent heavy rain and subsequent flooding in parts of England have wreaked havoc. Fortunately, the flood plain of the River Wylye has done its job and the usual small river has spread across vast acres of land – the sheer volume of water is incredible. It has created some interesting new photo opportunities (as long as you have a decent pair of wellies!) such as this picture of our local parish church. Quiet reflectionThe reflections here are in fields more used to grazing sheep and cattle than swimming trout!

This shot is one of those where things didn’t quite go according to plan. On the previous night (when, of course, I didn’t have my camera) the full moon was clear and bright, softly illuminating the scene and casting a perfect twin reflection on the water. In spite of the cloud and showers I decided to head out and try my luck. A patient wait was rewarded with an increase in cloud and heavy rain so I took this ‘souvenir’ shot and headed home disappointed. I’m probably the only one secretly hoping the high water will stay long enough for the next full moon :)

 (All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

EXIF data: ISO 200, 3 min 45s, f11 at 135mm, RAW file converted with Capture NX2

Bee-headed!

Tags

, , , , , , , , ,

As with my earlier post ‘Dragon catcher’ this isn’t going to be everyone’s thing, but once again it was a morbidly interesting subject and a challenge photographically. Technically speaking it’s not a bee either but a wasp; my excuse is that the title was too good to resist – well, at least I thought it was anyway! If nothing else at least it answers the question posed in the 2005 publication ‘Does anything eat wasps?’ :)  Bee-headed! When I first found them the praying mantis had the head in one ‘hand’ and the body in the other as if considering which part would be the tastiest – surprisingly it opted for the head, although maybe the body had been devoured by the time I returned with my camera. Why is it that you never have a camera with you when you need it? Funnily enough, that question works in reverse: why do you lug a camera around for hours and never use it? I guess the second question answers the first :D

(All images are copyright to Noeline Smith)

EXIF data: ISO 800, 1/30s, f20 at 105mm, RAW file converted with Capture NX2

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 325 other followers